The Student News Site of Fauquier High School

The Falconer

The Student News Site of Fauquier High School

The Falconer

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The Student News Site of Fauquier High School

The Falconer

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Thanks for reading The Falconer. We're happy to provide you with award-winning student journalism, free from bias, conflicts of interest, and paywalls. We're able to continue to operate through the generous support of our local community. If you're able, please consider making a donation. Any amount is incredibly helpful and allows us to pursue new and exciting opportunities.

The Apparent Decline of Media Literacy in Regards to Film

The internet, specifically social media, has paved a way for people to easily discuss their favorite kinds of media with others. With any of these discussions though, there will always be one or two people who leave a comment claiming that media literacy is dying. Unfortunately, it seems that they’re getting more correct every day.

Media literacy is a phrase that is often used to describe one’s ability to analyze and critically evaluate pieces of media. In the modern age, the discussion of media literacy is focused primarily on film and television. Despite being in such a media-focused age with the ability to discuss anything at our fingertips, it seems that people are starting to move towards simply consuming things on the surface level, and discussion or debate rarely occurs.

The new age of media on the internet is partially to blame for this trend. The internet incentivizes short-form, simple and surface-level content. Viewers are trained to watch, enjoy and scroll onto the next thing. This mindset is beginning to negatively affect other forms of media. Film and television are now considered by many to simply be entertainment, something to be consumed without a need to look for depth. This may be caused by, or may have caused, the current rise of movies and shows that are developed for the widest audience possible, where the message has to be clearly stated, or there may be no underlying meaning at all. Unfortunately, the lack of critical analysis from the audience, and the pandering to larger audiences from the industry, meld together to create this negative trend of critical analysis in film.

The internet seems like an amazing place to discuss and debate the intricacies of different media, however, most seem to be wary about interacting with others’ opinions on most social media platforms. Fans of content seem to be much more defensive about what they enjoy, leading to conversations about flaws and differing opinions to ultimately lead nowhere. Some become so scared that someone may misconstrue or misunderstand their favorite media that they attack those who interpret differently. Additionally, an attitude of “don’t like, don’t engage” permeates online fandom, crippling constructive criticism and healthy debate.

Of course, these recent developments may not be directly linked to a decline in media literacy, but it will contribute to a downfall over time. As media becomes more one-note, simpler in message and meaning, and fans of content push away those who dare to have other interpretations or criticisms, there will become less and less of a reason to critically analyze content like film, and the ability to do so will become defunct. It seems the internet, and the kind of content consumed on the internet may be signifying the end of film as an art form.

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Thanks for reading The Falconer. We're happy to provide you with award-winning student journalism since 1963, free from bias, conflicts of interest, and paywalls. We're able to continue with the generous support of our local community. If you're able, please consider making a donation. Any amount is incredibly helpful and allows us to pursue new and exciting opportunities.

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About the Contributor
Caleb Mitchell
As you may have noticed, my name is Caleb Mitchell. I’m currently a senior at FHS, and this is my first year working on the Falconer. I’m someone who spends most of their time engaging in some kind of creative outlet, mainly art in both traditional and digital mediums, podcasting and video editing. It seems that journalism has now joined the list too!
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